1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 13

Barnesreview. Com

bet1/13
Sana24.02.2017
Hajmi1.15 Mb.

VOLUME XIV NUMBER 5

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2008

BARNESREVIEW.COM

The Barnes Review

A J O U R NA L O F NAT I O NA L I S T T H O U G H T & H I S T O RY Bringing history into accord with the facts in the tradition of Dr. Harry Elmer Barnes

First time ever reviewed in the English language:

The great Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s banned book on

Russian-Jewish relations & the Christian holocaust



the Barnes Review

A J


OURNAL OF

N

ATIONALIST

T

HOUGHT


& H

ISTORY


S

EPTEMBER

/O

CTOBER

2008

y

V

OLUME

XIV

y

N

UMBER

5

I

NTRODUCTION TO

T

HIS

S

PECIAL

I

SSUE

. . .

B RINGING H ISTORY I NTO A CCORD W ITH THE F ACTS IN THE T RADITION OF D R . H ARRY E LMER B ARNES

T

his edition of TBR is entirely devoted to one of the most important books on the Russ-

ian Revolution and the Bolshevik era ever to be written: Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s The Jews in the Soviet Union. Together with part one, Russian Jewish History: 1795-1916,

they comprise Solzhenitsyn’s massive—and suppressed—200 Years Together. We’re

reviewing The Jews in the Soviet Union this issue because, as far as we know, this is the first and

only full-length review of the book ever to appear in the English language.

Distinguished Revisionist historian Udo Walendy reviewed Solzhenitsyn’s The Jews in the So- viet Union in his magazine Historische Tatsachen (“Historical Facts”). Our English translation

of that scholarly review—with many great photos added—comprises this September/October

2008 issue. We think it’s a blockbuster.

As Solzhenitsyn himself put it: “After 1917 life and people [in Russia] changed greatly. But

literature produced a very poor reflection of these changes. The truth was suppressed and lies

encouraged. Thus we arrived in the 1990s knowing next to nothing about this country. This

explains the great number of surprises.”

The German magazine Der Spiegel asked the great writer:

Your recent two-volume work 200 Years Together was an attempt to overcome a taboo

against discussing the common history of Russians and Jews. These two volumes have pro-

voked mainly perplexity in the West. You say the Jews are the leading force of global cap-

ital and they are among the foremost destroyers of the bourgeoisie. Are we to conclude

from your rich array of sources that the Jews carry more responsibility than others for the

failed Soviet experiment?

Solzhenitsyn replied:

I avoid exactly that which your question implies: I do not call for any sort of scorekeep-

ing or comparisons between the moral responsibility of one people or another; moreover,

I completely exclude the notion of responsibility of one nation toward another. All I am

calling for is self-reflection.

You can get the answer to your question from the book itself: Every people must answer

morally for all of its past—including that past which is shameful. Answer by what means?

By attempting to comprehend: How could such a thing have been allowed? Where in all

this is did we go wrong? And could it happen again?

It is in that spirit, specifically, that it would behoove the Jewish people to answer, both

for the revolutionary cutthroats and the ranks willing to serve them. Not to answer before

other peoples, but to oneself, to one’s conscience, and before God. Just as we Russians

must answer—for the pogroms, for those merciless arsonist peasants, for those crazed

revolutionary soldiers, for those savage sailors.

3

J

OHN

T

IFFANY

, Assistant Editor



G L O S S A R Y

O F


T E R M S

F O R


T H I S

I S S U E

2

S E P T E M B E R / O C T O B E R 2 0 0 8

Bolsheviks

(meaning “majority”) were

members of the faction of the Marxist

Russian Social Democratic Labor Party

(RSDLP) that split apart from the Men-

sheviks.


Bourgeoisie:

Those in the upper or mer-

chant class, whose status or power

comes not from aristocratic origin; the in-

corrigibly capitalistic.

Central Committee:

(CC) Most com-

monly refers to the central executive unit

of a Leninist (commonly also Trotskyite)

or Communist Party, whether ruling or

non-ruling.

Cheka

was the first of a succession of

Soviet state security organizations. It was

created by a decree issued on Dec. 20,

1917, by Lenin.

Commissar

is the English transliteration

of an official title used in Russia after the

Bolshevik revolution. It denotes a political

functionary at a military headquarters

who holds co-equal rank and authority

with his military counterpart.

Cossack:

For our discussion, the Cos-

sacks are a fiercely independent, au-

tonomous culture group found in large

enclaves in and around Russia. Cossack

regions were the main centers for White

resistance against communism.

CPSU:

The Communist Party of the So-

viet Union (Communisticheskaya Partiya

Sovetskogo Soyuza) was the ruling polit-

ical party in the Soviet Union. It emerged

in 1912 as the Bolshevik faction of the

Russian Social Democratic Labor Party

and then a separate party. The party led

the October Revolution, which led to the

establishment of a socialist state in Rus-

sia. The party was dissolved in 1991, at

the time of the breakup of the USSR.

GPU:

The State Political Directorate

(GPU) was the secret police of the Russ-

ian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic

(RSFSR) and the Soviet Union until 1934.

Formed from the Cheka, the Soviet state

security organization, it was initially known

under the Russian abbreviation GPU for

“Gosudarstvennoye Politicheskoye Up-

ravlenie of the NKVD of the RSFSR.”

Gulag:

Soviet labor/death camp system.

It spread across Russia like a chain of is-

lands, hence Solzhenitsyn’s use of the

term “gulag archipelago.” GULAG was in

actuality the government agency that ad-

ministered the penal labor camps of the

Soviet Union. Gulag is the Russian acro-

nym for The Chief Administration of Cor-

rective Labor Camps and Colonies.

Eventually the usage of “gulag” began to

denote the entire penal labor system in

the USSR, then any such penal system.

Izvestia

:

Newspaper started in 1917 es-

pousing, at that time, mostly Menshevik

views. During the Soviet period,

Izvestia

expressed the official views of the Soviet

government as published by the Presid-

ium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR.

KPD:

The Communist Party of Germany

(German: Kommunistische Partei Deutsch-

lands) was formed in December 1918

from the Spartacist League, which origi-

nated as a small factional grouping within

the Social Democratic Party (SPD), and

the International Communists of Germany

(IKD). Both factions opposed WWI on the

grounds that it was an imperialist war in

which the working class had no interest.

Kulak:

A Russian agriculturalist with a

small-to-medium-sized farm. Used de-

rogatorily by the Bolsheviks.

Mensheviks

(meaning “minority”) were a

faction of the Russian revolutionary move-

ment that emerged in 1903 after a dispute

between Vladimir Lenin and Julius Martov,

both members of the Russian Social-De-

mocratic Labor Party. The Mensheviks

(actually the majority) did not want to top-

ple the czar. They were outlawed in 1921.

Muzhik

denotes a Russian peasant.

Usage was especially common in pre-

1917 Imperial Russia; a reference to a

person belonging to a low social class or

status (specifically, working class or Third

Estate).

Nicholas II:

Nikolay Alexandrovich Ro-

manov (1868-1918) was the last czar of

Russia, king of Poland and grand duke of

Finland. He is currently regarded as Saint

Nicholas the Passion Bearer by the

Russian Orthodox Church. He and his

family were massacred by order of Lenin

at the Ipatiev house in Yekaterinburg.

NKVD

(People’s Commissariat for Inter-

nal Affairs) was the leading secret police

organization of the Soviet Union that was

responsible for political repression during

the Stalinist era.

Politburo:

The executive organization for

a number of political parties, most notably

for communist parties.

Pravda

:

(“Truth”) Newspaper was the of-

ficial mouthpiece of the Communist Party.

Proletariat

was a term used to identify a

lower social class.

Taiga:

For our discussion, the inhos-

pitable area below the Russian Arctic tree

line containing mostly coniferous forests.

Tass:

Soviet mass media outlet.

Terror Famine:

The forced famine insti-

tuted by the communists to kill as many

peasants and farmers as possible in

areas that rejected communism; 10-15

million people killed in 7 years.

Tundra:

A very cold Arctic region unable

to support forests due to freezing temper-

atures and short growing season.

White Russian:

Supporter of the czar.

Zemstvo

refers to a form of local govern-

ment instituted during the liberal reforms

of imperial Russia by Czar Alexander II.



Personal from the MANAGING Editor

T

his issue, TBR is proud to bring you something we know you

have never seen in the English language. It is an overview and

critical review of one of the most important books compiled in

the 20th century. The book being reviewed herein was written by

the 1970 recipient of the Nobel prize in literature and one of the most highly

respected writers and philosophers of the age—Russian dissident Aleksandr

Solzhenitsyn.

How could such a book escape publication in the United States? For that

matter, why has no one ever translated the book into English? The title

should help us understand why this book has been banned and suppressed

since the day it was completed. The title of the volume we are reviewing is,

simply, The Jews in the Soviet Union. This volume is part two of Solzhen-

itsyn’s massive two-book series 200 Years Together.

Pressure from extremely powerful Zionist sources, as you have already

figured out by the title, has kept this valuable work from reaching readers in

the West. And the reason for that will become obvious once you dive into

this issue of TBR. It details, with great precision, the Jewish involvement in

the creation of Bolshevism and communism and the willing participation of

Jews in perpetrating the worst mass murders of the 20th century—crimes

which dwarf claims about the so-called “holocaust.”

The number of innocent Christian Russians who died at the hands of the

Soviets is mind-boggling. Solzhenitsyn himself estimated the toll at 60 mil-

lion. Many Jews, it must be added, were also crushed under the Soviet

steamroller in later years, after Josef Stalin began to diminish their involve-

ment in political and military affairs.

The truth contained within Solzhenitsyn’s The Jews in the Soviet Union

might never have reached the Western world at all had not German historian

Udo Walendy brought it some much-deserved attention. Over his career, as

TBR readers know, this brave historian has published extremely honest and

forthright discussions of World War II. For doing so he has twice been im-

prisoned in Germany. Think about this courageous man and the price he has

paid for the truth as you read this special issue.

Please note: This detailed review by Walendy is not a fawning endorse-

ment of every word of Solzhenitsyn. Instead, Walendy takes the author to

task where he feels he has fallen short of Revisionist standards.

In addition to Walendy, we thank nationalists Roy Armstrong and John

Nugent for translating Walendy’s German review into English, and the many

TBR staffers and volunteers who contributed so heavily to this issue. We

think it is so important, we humbly suggest you buy extra copies to give to

libraries and friends. Please see the ad on page 65 for more information.

And while you’re at it, please renew your subscription to TBR. We can

honestly say, TBR brings you a magazine unlike any other in the world

today. Please see the full color

ADVANCE RENEW

insert found between pages

24 and 25 of this issue. There you will find a really special offer you’ll want

to take advantage of. And don’t miss the special message to all readers from

TBR founder and publisher Willis A. Carto bound in the center.

3

P

AUL

T. A

NGEL

, Managing Editor

T H E B A R N E S R E V I E W

3

T HE

B

ARNES


R

EVIEW


(ISSN 1078-4799) is published bimonthly by TBR Co.,

645 Pennsylvania Avenue SE, Suite 100, Washington, D.C. 20003. Periodical rate postage paid

at Washington, D.C. For credit card orders including subscriptions, call toll free

1-877-773-9077 to use Visa or MasterCard. Other inquiries cannot be handled through the toll free

number. For address changes, subscription questions, status of order and bulk distribution in-

quiries, please call 951-587-6936. All editorial (only) inquiries please call

202-547-5586. All rights reserved except that copies or reprints may be made without permission

so long as proper credit and contact info are given for TBR and no changes are made. All manu-

scripts submitted must be typewritten (doublespaced) or in computer format. No responsibility

can be assumed for unreturned manuscripts. Change of address: Send your old, incorrect mailing

label and your new, correct address neatly printed or typed 30 days before you move to assure de-

livery. 

Advertising

: M

EDIA

P LACEMENT

S

ERVICE


, Sharon Ellsworth, 301-729-2700; fax 301-

729-2712. 

Website: 

BarnesReview.com. 

Email

Business Office: 

tbrca@aol.com 

Editor:

barneseditor@barnesreview.org. 

Send regular mail to: 

TBR, P.O. Box 15877, Washington,

D.C. 20003.

POSTMASTER: 

Send address changes to T

HE

B

ARNES

R

EVIEW

,

P.O. Box 15877, Washington, D.C. 20003.

tBR SUBSCRIPTION Rates & Prices

(

ALL ISSUES MAILED IN CLOSED ENVELOPE

)

• U.S.A.

Periodical Rate: 1 year: 

$46; 

2 years: 

$78

First Class: 1 year: 

$70; 

2 years: 

$124

• CANADA & MEXICO: 1 year: 

$65; 

2 years: 

$130.

• ALL OTHER FOREIGN NATIONS: 1 year

: $80. Via Air Mail only.

(TBR accepting only 1-year foreign subscriptions at this time. Foreign Surface Rates no longer

available. All payments must be in U.S. dollars.)

QUANTITY PRICES:

1-3


$10 each

(Current issue—no S&H domestic U.S.)

4-7

$9 each


8-19

$8 each


20 and more

$7 each


Bound Volumes:

$99 per year for 1996-2007 (Vols. II-XIII)

Library Style Binder:

$25 each; year & volume indicated.

THE BARNES REVIEW

R

ICK

A

DAMS


Providence, Rhode Island

P

ETER

H

UXLEY


-B

LYTHE


Nottingham, England

J

OAQUIN

B

OCHACA


Barcelona. Spain

M

ATTHIAS

C

HANG


Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

R

OBERT

C

LARKSON


, J.D. Anderson, South Carolina

T

REVOR

J. C

ONSTABLE


San Diego, California

H

ARRY

C

OOPER


Hernando, Florida

D

ALE

C

ROWLEY


J

R

.

Washington, D.C.

S

AM

G. D

ICKSON


, J.D. Atlanta, Georgia

V

ERNE

E. F

UERST


, P

H

.D.

Farmington, Connecticut

M

ARK

G

LENN


Careywood, Idaho

P

ROF

. R

AY

G

OODWIN Victoria, Texas

J

UERGEN

G

RAF


Basel, Switzerland

A.B. K


OPANSKI

, P


H

.D.


Klang Lama, Malaysia

R

ICHARD

L

ANDWEHR


Brookings, Oregon

D

ANIEL

W. M

ICHAELS


Washington, D.C.

E

USTACE

M

ULLINS


Staunton, Virginia

R

YU

O

HTA


Tokyo, Japan

G

RACE

-E

KI

O

YAMA Osaka, Japan

M

ICHAEL

C

OLLINS


P

IPER


Washington, D.C.

L

ADY

M

ICHELE


R

ENOUF


London, England

H

ARRELL

R

HOME


, P

H

.D.

Corpus Christi, Texas

G

ERMAR

R

UDOLF


Gulag Germany

V

INCENT

J. R

YAN


Washington, D.C.

H

ANS

S

CHMIDT


Pensacola, Florida

E

DGAR

S

TEELE


Sandpoint, Idaho

V

ICTOR

T

HORN


State College, Pennsylvania

F

REDRICK

T

ÖBEN


Adelaide, Australia

J

AMES

P. T

UCKER


Washington, D.C.

U

DO

W

ALENDY


Vlotho, Germany

Editor & Publisher: 

W

ILLIS


A. C

ARTO


Assistant Editor: 

J

OHN


T

IFFANY


Managing Editor/Art Director: 

P

AUL


A

NGEL


Advertising Director: 

S

HARON


E

LLSWORTH


Board of Contributing Editors:



B

Y

U

DO

W

ALENDY

A

leksandr Isaevich Solzhenitsyn

has proved to be without doubt

both a very important and indus-

trious writer. He was born on

December 11, 1918 in Kislovodsk, Stavropol

Krai, Russia. While an artillery captain in the

Red Army, he was arrested in February 1945

in East Prussia because of an exchange of

letters that criticized Josef Stalin between the

lines and that was zealously read by political

monitors.

For 8 years, from 1945 through 1953, he

suffered through the work camps of the

gulag and then spent three more years in an

internal banishment region of Kazakhstan.

Afterward, he was a mathematics teacher.

Assured of government approval by

Nikita Khrushchev (the communist head of

state after Stalin) who had introduced a free-speech period or

“thaw,” he released in 1962 his fictionalized account One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, the first Soviet work of litera-

ture about Stalin’s punishment camps. It was translated imme-

diately into numerous languages.

Then new attacks and persecution began. None of his im-

portant novels after Ivan Denisovich was allowed to appear in

the Soviet Union: Cancer Ward (1968); The First Circle of Hell

(1968); The Gulag Archipelago (three volumes in most printed

editions, 1973-1978); and a cycle of novels called The Red

Wheel, consisting of August 1914 (1971), November 1916

(two volumes, 1984) and March 1917 (two volumes, 1989-

1990). A fourth tome in the cycle, April 1917, is not yet trans-

lated into English.

He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1970, but

did not dare travel to Oslo to receive it, fearing he would be

banned from Russia. That same year he was in fact excluded

from the Soviet Writers Federation (which readmitted him

only in 1989 under glasnost). He was expelled from the So-

viet Union in 1974 and lived in Vermont from 1976 to 1994.

Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev reha-

bilitated him in 1990 and restored his Russ-

ian citizenship.

The present discussion is concerned with

the second volume of Solzhenitsyn’s two-

volume work. Together they are called Two

HundredYears Together. In romanized Russ-

ian, this is Dvyesti lyet vmestye.

The first volume was Russian-Jewish History 1795-1916 and ran to 512 pages,

published in 2001. In 2002 the second vol-

ume appeared, a 600-page-long investiga-

tion called The Jews in the Soviet Union.

His preceding books, written in the form

of novels, were often based on historical

facts and personal experiences, and all could

lay claim to correct and provable factuality

regarding the historical events they de-

scribed. As far as we know no one—apart

from communist dogmatists unable to toss

overboard their mendacious party dialectic—has dared attack

or refute him on his facts. He merits outstanding recognition

for this in view of the abundance of detail in his works. In his

book The Jews in the Soviet Union, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

has once again opened up for us a multiplicity of Russian

sources that previously had been inaccessible or unevaluated

in German-speaking countries.

His Two Hundred Years Together series abandoned his

usual form of fiction in favor of scientific analysis. Possibly

this was also due to the controversial topic: Jewish power and

anti-Semitism. There is only one problem with this otherwise

excellent book, chapter nine, “At War with Germany.” Chapter

nine should also have received his usual comprehensive doc-

umentary analysis. But here we cannot avoid the reproach, to

be detailed later, that the Nobel Prize-winning Solzhenitsyn,

whom we otherwise profoundly respect, copied for this chap-

ter exclusively from biased Jewish and Soviet sources, in fact

mostly from state historians, without feeling compelled to un-

dertake one single critical examination.

As an experienced analyst, he should have known that

I N T R O D U C T I O N




Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?


batis-azastan-oblisini.html

batis-azastan-oblisti-5.html

batis-rne-tn-kim-keshek.html

batkenskoe-oblastnoe.html

batlanmaq---yardlamaq-.html